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Thread: Jetboil Review

  1. #1

    Jetboil Review

    Thought some of you might be interested in the Jetboil. It rocks for moto camping.

    Here is a duplicate of a review I did on another site:

    Santa brought me a Jetboil stove this year and it seems like it would work quite well for motorcycle camping as well. I bought for solo mountaineering because of the fuel consumption, weight and size. I have a couple of white gas/multi-fuel stoves, and the MSR Pocket, the MSR is hard to beat at 3oz. The problem with all stoves in winter camping is this; they rarely pack with pans and fuel bottle efficiently, and fumbling in the cold with a pan, cover, stove, pan holder, while balancing all this on an uneven surface with popsicle like digits sucks. At least that's how I justified it to Mrs. Mad (aka Santa).

    There are a few other things I have struggled with; the cost of a titanium pan is $40-70, plus I wanted a setup that I could hang inside a tent and cook if the weather is bad. (I know, I know, but I'm a rebel and tear the tags off my mattress too.) Also, I didn't want another stove that takes proprietary fuel. I've also been looking for a decent way to make coffee on the trail, they all seem to be separate units which is hard to justify when hiking.

    So I asked Santa for the Jetboil.


    I haven't used it camping yet, but so far I like it.
    It claims to boil one cup of water in one minute, so we tested it (inside ~65F) and sure enough it was boiling after 60 seconds.

    Here's what I like about it:
    Cost - $77 with coffee press kit from here (best price and good customer service so far)
    Weight -15oz (not sure if that is with fuel or not) not the best, but not bad if that's all you need.
    Compact - smart design that packs the fuel, stove, drinking cup, stabilizer for the base, and maybe the coffee press (don't have that yet) all in the pan/mug. See here:

    Easy - the entire unit locks together and you eat or drink from the pan. This allows me to fashion some way to hang the entire unit together to cook inside the tent. There is less fumbling with keeping the pan on the burner too.
    Function - There is a neoprene sock around the pan so you can hold it while you eat without a pan holder. It also has a strap sewn into the sock to better hold the mug.
    Efficient - amazing how quick it boils water, and the sock seems to keep it warm while you eat, not to mention your hands. There are lttle ridges at the bottom that seem to trap and transfer the heat better than a regular stove/pan combo.
    Smart - Seems like it was designed by someone who actually uses the product. Little things like a marker inside for 2 cups, the same volume required by most freeze-dried meals or the built in starter suggest it was not made by an engineer locked in a basement somewhere. There is an interesting history on the site about the development. Also, it's made in New Hampshire, so I'm a little biased.
    Coffee - Built in coffee press makes it realistic to make Joe on the trail.
    Open - accepts MSR fuel bottles as well, although they cannot be stored inside the pot.


    Here's what I don't like:
    Weight - seems a litte heavy for hardcore camping, the stove seems to be the worst part, but still the best value out there for all the components.
    Strap - there is a loop on one side of the neoprene, but not the other. If it had two loops you could easily hang it and cook in your tent.
    More marks - I would prefer that it had another measurement at one cup in addition to the 2 cup. Now I'm jsut getting fussy.

    Overall , this thing rocks. Seems like a great solution if you solo motorcycle camp and want to trim down on space. I will put it to the test and post any results after a real camping trip.

  2. #2

    Re: Jetboil Review

    I read many reviews on the internet and looked at a bunch of stoves. I bought a JETBOIL JAVA KIT from Best of New England on EBAY for $73.45. It included the above described Personal Cooking System with a French coffee press. I haven't yet tried it but it looked like the best stove for my needs.
    Terry

  3. #3
    RIP - 3/20/2011 Alan's Avatar
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    Re: Jetboil Review

    I have used a Jetboil many times on my motorcycle camping trips. I only use it for boiling water, I have never put food into the Jetboil, I have no interest in cleaning up pots. The Jetboil does do a great job of boiling water. I have had a recurring problem with the fuel though. If it gets real cold out overnight, 30's or 40's, the fuel must jell up because it is very hard to get any fuel pressure if the fuel cannister is real cold. I have learned to keep the fuel cannister inside my sleeping bag with me overnight to keep it warm for the morning.

    Of course when you first slip into that sleeping bag with the cold cannister, yipes! If your wife ever warmed her cold feet on you on a cold winter night, you know what I'm talking about.
    Alan

    IBA 20568
    AMA 402014
    2003 Honda ST1300
    1969 Honda CB750

  4. #4

    Re: Jetboil Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan
    I have used a Jetboil many times on my motorcycle camping trips. I only use it for boiling water, I have never put food into the Jetboil, I have no interest in cleaning up pots. The Jetboil does do a great job of boiling water. I have had a recurring problem with the fuel though. If it gets real cold out overnight, 30's or 40's, the fuel must jell up because it is very hard to get any fuel pressure if the fuel cannister is real cold. I have learned to keep the fuel cannister inside my sleeping bag with me overnight to keep it warm for the morning.

    Of course when you first slip into that sleeping bag with the cold cannister, yipes! If your wife ever warmed her cold feet on you on a cold winter night, you know what I'm talking about.
    This is why I have a stove that runs on gasoline. Propane/Butane can freeze. Plus those little canisters can be kind of expensive and hard to find in remote or rural areas. I can fill my stove while I am refueling my bike, relatively inexpensive and very convenient.

  5. #5
    Mellow
    Guest

    Re: Jetboil Review

    I just got an REI flyer in the mail today that was an Anniversary Sale for May 5-14 and the Jet Boil Personal Cooking System was on sale for $59.99 (reg $79.99).

    I couldn't find anything on the website and couldn't find anything on the flyer that indicated it was just for a particular region.. but, the catalog code is GSAS.

  6. #6
    Mellow
    Guest

    Re: Jetboil Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiny
    Is that just the basic set-up? I have seen the basic plus the coffee press for $79.99, so that would be a bettr deal since the coffee set-up is $19.99 on their web-site.
    Sorry, didn't see this 'til I got to work and I left the catalog at home. I'll check when I get home to see what's included, it looked like just the basic system to me.

  7. #7
    Mellow
    Guest

    Re: Jetboil Review

    It looks like the special price is for the burner and the pot, no coffee press.

  8. #8

    JetBoil Personal cooking system

    I rated durability low because I've only had the cooker about 1 month and have had limited use so far.

    It boils water in about 2 mins at 3500ft altitude on the Blue Ridge Parkway and is cool to the touch within 3 mins after use.

    Gordon
    Gordon

  9. #9
    Mellow
    Guest

    Re: JetBoil Personal cooking system

    I saw one of these in person a couple weeks back and it was a nice, compact setup and most of the time all I need is to boil water.. If you keep your food in other containers or pouches or just need water for coffee the clean up is pretty much nil.

  10. #10
    RIP - 3/20/2011 Alan's Avatar
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    Re: JetBoil Personal cooking system

    I've used a JetBoil for several years and am generally satisified with it. Only problem I've had is with very cold temps, the fuel jells up and the stove doesn't work very good then. I've learned to keep the fuel canister inside my sleeping bag with me if the morning temps are going to be in the 40's or lower.

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