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Thread: Hickory run state park, pa

  1. #1
    ILIKEYMYWING! wingpilot08's Avatar
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    Hickory run state park, pa

    was surprised not to HICKORY RUN STATE PARK in the list. Was there a couple years ago and will be going this weekend and camping out with my son-in-law, daughter and grandsons. Will be taking the wing and BH. First time in the "new" to me 1995.BH.

    The 15,990-acre Hickory Run State Park, Carbon County, lies in the western foothills of the Pocono Mountains. This large park has:

    More than 40 miles of hiking trails
    Three state park natural areas
    Miles of trout streams
    Top 10 Activities at Hickory Run
    Walk across Boulder Field.
    Cool off your feet in waters below Hawk Falls.
    Enjoy the solitude of Stametz Dam along Shades of Death Trail.
    Throw a picnic! Play 18-holes of disc golf followed by a picnic in Sand Spring Day Use Area.
    View the Lehigh Gorge along Fireline Trail.
    Pull a wild brook trout from Hickory Run or Mud Run.
    Have an ice cream after swimming in Sand Spring Lake.
    Cross-country ski Sand Spring Trail.
    Spend a weekend with the family in a rustic camping cottage.
    Visit a neighbor -- Lehigh Gorge State Park!

    History of: https://www.dcnr.pa.gov/StateParks/F...s/History.aspx

    Camping
    flush toilets, warm showers, some electric hook-ups

    The large tent and trailer camping area has modern restrooms with warm showers, a sanitary dump station, a forested section and a grassy, more open section. Many sites have electric hook-ups. Some sites have full service hook up, which includes:

    Sewer
    Water
    Electricity
    The campground has modern facilities from the second Friday in April until the third Sunday in October when the dump station and all facilities with running water close for the season. Rustic camping continues until mid-December.

    Pets are permitted on designated sites.

    A camp store has general camping supplies, ice, firewood, and food.

    Alcoholic beverages are prohibited. (BUMMER)

    Pictures to follow!
    2008 GL1800-HPNA with 55,000+ miles
    1995 BunkHouse camper
    Darkside #1720


  2. #2
    ILIKEYMYWING!
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    wingpilot08's Avatar
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    Re: Hickory Run State Park, PA

    Nice CG, Clean restrooms, great trails, had a great time there this weekend!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hickory 1.jpg   hickory 2.jpg   hickory 3 (2).jpg  

  3. #3

    Re: Hickory run state park, pa

    What is the story on all those rocks? Streambed?

  4. #4

    Re: Hickory run state park, pa

    https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/...-boulder-field

    The 16-acre expanse in the northeast portion of the park is startlingly level across the tips of the countless boulders and features an unmistakable lack of vegetation with its borders, despite being surrounded by greenery on all sides. The rocks were deposited in their current formation over 20,000 years ago as glacial melting deposited the stones in one long swath. Most of the field consist of medium-size boulders, although some of the larger rocks are as large as 26-feet across.

    Go to link for additional info!

  5. #5

    Re: Hickory run state park, pa

    Camped there lots of times, nice...
    2019 Ultra Limited, 2017 RAH, 2006 Kompact Kamp
    ABATE, HOG, IBMC,
    VVA, VFW, American Legion, NRA

  6. #6
    ILIKEYMYWING!
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    Re: Hickory run state park, pa

    The boulders in the Hickory Run boulder field range from less than 3-foot (0.91 m) to more than 30-foot (9.1 m) in length. They consist of hard, gray-red, medium-grained sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone from the Catskill Formation which forms the adjacent ridgelines. The boulders at the northeast, upslope, end of the boulder field are generally more angular than those found downslope to the southwest. In the southwest part of the boulder field, boulders are typically subrounded and overlie a layer of small, polished clasts with a red weathering rind. To the southeast, there is a distinct group of boulders, which are less than 15-foot (4.6 m) long. They appear to be bedrock that is shattered in situ.[8][9]

    One of two processes, both involving periglacial processes, explains the formation of boulder fields, such as the Hickory Run boulder field.[9] First, boulder-size blocks are generated from the fracturing of an upslope bedrock outcrop by alternating freeze and thaw. As boulders accumulate at the base of the rock slope, periglacial ice-catalyzed heaving and sliding transports them downslope during cold climatic periods to form boulder fields.[6] Finally, boulder fields are also formed by the exhumation of corestones. Initially, corestones form underground by the action of spheroidal weathering on jointed bedrock. Later, the weathered rock, which is called saprolite and formed by the alteration of rock, is progressively removed by erosion from around the corestones to expose them as isolated boulders. In time, these boulders are altered and redistributed over time by the accumulation of unconsolidated soil and sediment; freeze and thaw; and perhaps by periglacial action or glaciation during cold periods to form boulder fields.[10]

    The presence of glacial erratics south of the area of the Hickory Run boulder field indicate that this area has been covered by an ice sheet at least once, although the timing of the ice sheet or multiple ice sheets is uncertain. The most extensive ice sheet to cover the area containing this boulder field occurred prior to 900,000 years ago as evidenced by reversed magnetic polarity glacial deposits found south of the boulder field. Proglacial deposits of normal polarity suggest the occurrence of another glaciation extensive enough to covered this area sometime after 740,000 years ago. The last glaciation to have covered the area of the Hickory Run boulder field is mapped as Illinoian, about 150,000 years ago. However, it is possible that this ice sheet is somewhat older than this at about 400,000 years ago[9][11]

    However, cosmogenic nuclide studies demonstrate that some boulders of the Hickory Run boulder field have been exposed at the near surface for about 600,000 years. The interpretation of this data concluded that this boulder field has survived multiple glacial-interglacial cycles and possibly at least one glaciation. This conclusion would indicate that it and other boulder fields are dynamic features that persisted through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles because of the resistance of boulders to weathering and erosion. The large size of Hickory Run boulder field likely reflects multiple periods of periglacial activity during a number of glacial periods.[9]

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