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Thread: electrical input needed

  1. #21

    Re: electrical input needed

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C-G View Post
    You're not actually wrong... the WWII German 263 Comet rocket plane had a little propeller that generated all the electrical needs in flight. I wouldn't go with 3' blades, but you could certainly generate a little electricity while riding. Mind you, I don't think I'd want the drag. The issue will still be the battery storage problem. You would have to carry a couple of large and heavy deep cycle batteries to have any chance of cooking much. There is a reason why travel trailers almost all use propane. I'm going to get a 5 lb. refillable tank as I hate the waste of the disposable 1 lbers.
    I have a 5lb cylinder but holds only 4lbs of useable lp gas and the local supplier has a 5lb minimum charge per tank. I made a tank to tank refill hose that is a (pia) to use and probably illegal. I like mine.
    KISS

  2. #22

    Re: electrical input needed

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C-G View Post
    Seems to be a lot of recalls on the 1 lb. refillable. I seem to have trouble getting someone out to fill my 20 lb. tank right now and expect a lot of attendants will find it a chore to come do a 5 lb-er. I can see waiting a long time for the 50 cent fill on a 1 lb. tank.
    I believe the idea is to refill the 1 lb tank using your 20 lb tank yourself with the refill kit.

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  3. #23
    Jim C-G's Avatar
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    Re: electrical input needed

    Quote Originally Posted by lqqk_out View Post
    I believe the idea is to refill the 1 lb tank using your 20 lb tank yourself with the refill kit.

    http://www.motocampers.com/forums/sh...e-LP-cylinders
    Well... that won't help me when I am out on the road for as long as I am hoping to be. Probably 8-10 weeks on one stint and another 3-4 weeks in the fall. I figure the 5 lb-er will get me thru 2-3 weeks and if I have to pay for 5 and only get 4 lb... well, that's what it will be. I have looked at getting one of the adapters to refill the NON-refillable tanks. Some people swear by them. If I was camping a lot near home and had access to my 20 lb. bbq tanks, I might think of going that route.

  4. #24
    Jim C-G's Avatar
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    Re: electrical input needed

    And we really did hijack and run away with this electrical thread... buy more solar panels and deep cycle batteries.

  5. #25
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    Re: electrical input needed

    Thanks Jim C-G I still need to pick up the connecting cables to test running the inverter on two combined 100 aHr batteries in parallel. As far as the propane info I too bought a 5# refillable tank at an Amish store. I am however surprised at how heavy it is for only holding 5# propane. I'll weigh it latter today and report back.

  6. #26
    Mostly Harmless Hoovooloo's Avatar
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    Re: electrical input needed

    Alternative to propane... I have two single burner Colman dual fuel stoves that I use. I like them because I can burn coleman white gas or the same unleaded fuel as my bike. I can get a whole weekend of meals from a single tank of fuel. About 12oz. I think. I don't have to worry about running out of fuel. Plus, my spare bottle of fuel can be used as emergency fuel for the bike if I carry unleaded fuel. That said, this is not a cook in closed space setup. You must cook outside. On a long trip I carry both stoves for ease of cooking, but on a short weekend ride I only carry one. This would reduce the weight of having to carry big batteries in order to support electric cooking items. I can pack one stove and my pots in a gallon ziplock bag. And, it weighs about 2.5 lbs with fuel. I also carry a 12.6v 5ah 3s1p lithium pack to recharge and power camp items and usb stuff. While riding I use the bike to recharge all batteries via USB and 12v chargers. I have them plugged into power ports that are only hot while the bike is running so I don't kill the battery when stopped.
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  7. #27
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    Re: electrical input needed

    Ok update time. First I want to thank everyone for their help and input. I might have got there on my own , but I only have enough knowledge on 12v / 120v electrical to be dangerous.
    1) I weighed the 5# propane tank full = 15.25 lbs.
    2) I connected the two 100 aH batteries in parallel with number 4 copper wires. The wires are 24 inches in length. The inverter came with only 16mm (about number 6) 20 inches long.
    3) I started with best case possible so I charged both batteries the night before with their ac charging bricks. Both were at 100% charge on their 5 light meters.
    4) Plugged the insta pot in and turned on the power switch in the inverter but not the insta pot yet. The inverter meters stabilized at 120v ac and 12v dc. When we started the Insta Pot (we were making 2.25 cups of simple white rice as part of a meal) the meters went down to 118v ac and 11.4v dc.
    5) Over the course of 10 to 15 minutes for the pot to get to temp. and pressure the dc voltage dropped to 10.4 and the five light meters on both batteries dropped to 3 lights each. So I hope that means the batteries are bleeding power equally.
    6) The thinner leads to the inverter and the inverter itself warmed up a bit but not the heavier #4 leads tying the two batteries together. The built in fan came on in the inverter as I think it is designed to.
    7) After getting to temp / pressure the pot started to cycle to maintain and the meters on the inverter would cycle from the lows of (118v ac and 10.5 dc ) to ( 120 ac and 11.3 dc ) This took another 6 minutes to cook the rice.
    8) After another 10 minutes to natural release pressure. The meters stayed at the high numbers (120 / 11.3) and the 5 light meters on the batteries went back to lighting 4 lights.
    Conclusion / question
    IT WORKED But put the batteries to the test. Would increasing the lighter wires to also #4 help slow the voltage drop? Less power loss due to resistance?

  8. #28
    Mostly Harmless Hoovooloo's Avatar
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    Re: electrical input needed

    Not significantly.

  9. #29
    Jim C-G's Avatar
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    Re: electrical input needed

    @almostthere It won't hurt to go to 4 gauge from the batteries to the inverter. The cooker is only pulling the full 800 watts for a few minutes during it's cooking cycle but it looks like it was quite the draw on the system. I would not want to count on cooking with electricity every night. Can you do a test to see how much time in the sunlight it takes to charge the batteries up fully?

  10. #30
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    Re: electrical input needed

    That will be one of my test goals when we start getting good weather here in SW Michigan. Still wet gloomy and on - off snow flurries. Come on spring time sun. Don't plan on many dinners in a row this way. But I want a way to cook a hot meal if we are in a "no camp fire " area.

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