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Thread: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Hi guys and gals.

    Just thought I'd share my 20 plus years Moto-Camping essentials list with anyone that was interested. I went through many phases with my Moto-Camping over the years. Loaded for bear, light as a feather and everywhere in-between. For the last 5 years or so, I have honed my gear. The Primary bike through the years was my 1995 Triumph Trophy 1200 with side hard luggage and trunk, so I had some packing space. I also added a tank bag and a passenger seat bag as I always went solo. On top of the passenger seat bag I put my bedroll/cott and tent if I went with a larger 5 man tent for space. Now I've also got a 1982 Honda CL500 Interstate Silverwing with much smaller luggage and CC, so packing that bike lighter is essential.

    Sleeping. IMO, the most important essentials are the tent and the cot/bedroll. A 1 person tiny backpack tent may appeal because of size, but if it rains cats and dogs at your campsite all day and all night and all the following day, you will thank yourself for bringing a tent that is large enough to "Hang Out" in without going stir crazy. You can't do that in a 1 man tent, or even a 2 man tent. A 3 man tent starts to give you some elbow room for gear and a small chair as well as your bedroll/cot. This can be a lifesaver in foul weather. I also tend to carry a tarp with extendable poles to set up a covered area over my tent and gear so I can hang out in the shade if it's sunny, without having to sit in the tent. This is more of a luxury but I'll list that too. Sleeping is the key. You MUST be comfortable. On one of my rides from Florida to Ohio, I got stuck in a Hurricane in southern Georgia and had to spend two days in a hotel. Then I got on the road in still damp clothing and rode to Kentucky with late Spring temps that resembled late Winter. The Hurricane had lowered temps drastically in KY that night and it went down to 30 degrees. I only had one of those GI Microfiber Sleeping bags. I FROZE. At 3 AM I had to get on my bike and ride to a 24 hour Walmart to buy a real sleeping bag. Ruined my night and that trip. The secret is to pack as light as possible and STILL be prepared for temp changes and climate, while ensuring COMFORTABLE sleep. That's so paramount it's hard to over-emphasize. You don't want to ride all day, be so uncomfortable at night you can't sleep, then have to get up the next day and ride all day again. Very dangerous.

    Cooking. An essential. I've been through all kinds of stoves. Butane, propane, Coleman Fuel, Gas, Alcohol. For space, nothing beats an Alcohol stove. I found one that is larger than normal, durable all stainless steel and simply superb. It will be listed below. I also find that the Coleman single burner 533 Sportster is the best of the Coleman smaller packing stoves you can buy, and because it runs on gasoline as well as Coleman Fuel, it's a winner. It takes up about 8 x the space of the alcohol stove, so if space is a premium, you go with alcohol. Then I'll post my cookwear sets (small and larger depending on your needs and packing requirements). Note, the Coleman stove happens to fit inside a Folgers plastic coffee can perfectly for packing, like the can was designed for the stove. Just a handy note for you.

    Entertainment. Relaxing comfort is important to me after a long day of riding. I pack a small USB Powered fan, a small electric heater (if I'll be camping in cool climates), my iPad for entertainment and a Bluetooth Stereo Speaker for music. I also pack a solar USB Charger/Battery just in case the campsite has no electric. This has saved my butt on several occasions. I have about 90 hours worth of music on my iPhone, but I also pay $3.95 a month for Slacker Radio to have unlimited and inexpensive music on demand. All other services are $9.95 so Slacker is a bargain. I have hotspot on my phone in the event the campground does not have WiFi. A lifesaver. I have U-verse at home so I can watch TV via the U-Verse App if I want to via WiFi or Hotspot, but when I'm camping this is a rarity. I usually just listen to music and read. The iPad is perfect for reading. Otherwise, I'd carry a Kindle.

    Packable Chair and table. I have to say that a decent chair that is small enough to set up in a tent, yet comfortable enough to sit in at a campfire is very important to me. So is a little stool to put my feet up on, and a packable table. I have all three with me on all trips. The advent of the newer backpack chairs that can hold around 250 lbs (some more) are fantastic, and they are comfortable. A small table to either dine on if it's raining or mosquitoes are biting you relentlessly and you have to escape to the safety of your tent is also a nice thing to have. And it doubles as a stand for your other gear like cell phone, iPad, Bluetooth Speaker, etc. And a foldable stool can also double as a spare chair in the event you need 2 places to sit if unexpected company stops by. The little stool can also be used as a little table as well, so your possibilities are doubled with having one along.

    That's the overview. Here is the list:

    Tent. The best value by far is the K-Mart or Sears (same company now) 3 person tent. It's the Northwest Territory Sierra 3 person dome tent. I got this for $19.95 on sale 6 years ago, but have still seen them recently for $24.95 on sale. Still a huge bargain. This tent has good reviews for a reason. It does not leak even in the hardest and longest rain, it has footlockers for muddy or wet shoes, it packs small, sets up quickly and is roomy for a moto camping tent. You can sleep 2 no problem with limited extra room for gear, but for 1, it's downright roomy and I've spent many a dry day and night in that tent while it's pouring outside. I have larger tents, and smaller tents, but this one is my all-around favorite for a reason. It's very roomy for one, and sleeps 2 no problem with room for gear. I've paid 10 x this amount for a tent and was not this happy. Truly, this is a supreme bargain. I have also listed the 4-5 person tent that has plenty of room for two campers with cots, chairs and gear. I am upgrading to this larger tent next year. I've finally outgrown the $20 3 person tent after 10 years of heavy use. I'd say I got my money's worth.
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    LINK 3 person: http://www.sears.com/northwest-terri...1&blockType=G1
    LINK 4-5 person: http://www.kmart.com/northwest-terri...5&blockType=G5

    Cots and bedrolls are user preference, I recently gave up on a Cot because I could not find one that was very small packing for a motorcycle, and durable enough for camp. I tried a few versions but none held up to repeated use on un-level ground. Most of these backpacking cots have a unique plastic snap on legs engineering technology that is cool looking and works great at home, but if you get to un-level ground or move around a bit when you sleep, you may find that the legs bend or snap off rendering the cot useless. I did and I'm not a huge guy. I'm under 200 lbs and even the 400 lb cots I tried didn't hold up. But if you insist, you can find them on Amazon for under $100 to try your luck. I'm now sticking with just bedrolls (mattresses).

    Bedroll is also important to me for on top of the cot. I like this one at present because it rolls small, self-inflates, is a brand name, roughly half the cost of other name brands and has been durable as well as comfortable. It also fits on the cot nicely and makes a really comfy combo for a good night and good rest. But for about twice the price, I am also including the Klimat V mat. This is the pinnacle of comfort and small packing. This rolls significantly smaller than the budget bedrool if space is at a premium, and is actually a bit more comfortable. I'm also listing the Klymit XL because it's huge for bigger campers and for those that like to have a larger sleeping area. It's also insulated with a good R insulation value, and packs incredibly small:
    LINK Budget Bedroll: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-20000...ating+camp+pad
    LINK Klymit V: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=ATVPDKIKX0DER
    LINK Klymit XL: https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Insula...ords=klymit+xl

    Stoves are essential. If super small packing is not that important, I highly recommend the Coleman 533 Sportster dual fuel. Coleman Fuel or Gasoline in a pinch. Otherwise, it's the Stainless Steel OUT-D Alcohol Stove because it's 1/4 the size of the Coleman, but large enough and durable enough to last a decade or more of camping. Plus, it can handle larger pots just like the Coleman.
    LINK Alcohol Stove: https://www.amazon.com/Out-d-Stainle...+alcohol+stove
    LINK Coleman Stove: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Guide...ds=coleman+533

    Cookwear. I like the new non-stick backpack camp set available at Amazon for around $20. This packs fairly small, yet is large enough for two people to cook with. There is also a slightly larger stainless steel cookset I have used when meals will be a bit larger or I am constantly cooking for two. The stainless set also comes with stainless dishes built in. I do not like the Stanley cookset that is all the buzz on the internet because it is very narrow to the point of toppling on the stove burners, and harder to clean because of the depth vs width.
    LINK Non-Stick: https://www.amazon.com/Cookware-Back...s=camp+cookset
    LINK Stainless: https://www.amazon.com/BeGrit-Backpa...s+camp+cookset

    Chair and Tables. Here are my packable chair and table and footstool. There are smaller chairs, but this one is my favorite, albeit a tad larger than the typical backpack chairs. I'm listing an ultra-small backback chair as well if every cubic inch of space is important to you. But comfort is the key to me, and this "Lounging" chair works better with a footstool. Both of these chairs hold around 300 lbs, so weight is not an issue. The tables are a nice perk for having something to put things on in the tent or camping area if you don't have a picnic table, yet they pack super small. Note that you also need tent floor protectors for the chair legs, and these protectors also come in handy for soft ground when sitting outside by the campfire.
    LINK Lounging Chair: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...A1UVG9BNTU369T
    LINK Ultra small BackPack Chair: https://www.amazon.com/Innovative-Fo...backpack+Chair
    LINK Camp Table: https://www.amazon.com/Moon-Lence-Po...ck+table&psc=1
    LINK Footstool: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=ATVPDKIKX0DER
    LINK Chair Leg Tent Floor Protectors: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...A2ENTBEZKGXKVW

    LIGHTING! Thought I forgot about this, eh? So many possibilities. I find that solar recharging is key. The one I like doubles as a flashlight OR a camplight and is charged via the sun OR you can plug it in to AC and charge it that way. I also like the small dome USB rechargable tent light. The dome light can also (because it has a USB OUT) be used to charge a cell phone in a pinch. This domelight happens to be very small, yet throws a considerable amount of light with high and low settings and even an S.O.S. setting. It's my favorite tent ceiling light.
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Heating and cooling. There are a plethora of small AC heaters that I have used in my tent. I put aluminum foil on the floor and set the heater to low, and it's amazing how warm it can keep a tent. Any of the the small space heaters at Walmart will do. But for portable fans for cooling, I have searched high and low to find two really good ones. One is a 6" blade USB powered and the other is a smaller rechargeable USB BATTERY powered. Your choice. The USB fan does move much more air, but does not pack as neatly as the smaller rechargeable fan. The smaller battery fan needs a flat surface to stand on, while the USB fan has a wider base that you can put on the tent floor if you need to.
    For heat in a small package, there is an awesome 200 watt personal heater available from Amazon for a low price. This is easy to pack and only draw 200 watts so you won't be tripping any breakers at the campsite. Also, this little heater is QUIET! It does not have a thermostat, just an off an on switch, but for the price, the quiet, and the low wattage draw combined with a small package, it's a great heater for moto-camping.
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    LINK to HEATER: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Sleeping bags are so plentiful it's impossible to post a favorite. They all work. If your camping will be in warm climates, you can't beat the tiny fleece bags that cram into a tiny carry bag so small it's ridiculous. But heed my warning, and if the weather changes to cold, you'll freeze in these bags. But they pack so small, it may be worth you looking into one if you are camping where the temps will not dip below 60 degrees at night. I have been using this one recently and it's a good compromise between packing small, and having a bag that can handle temps down to about 40 degrees F. It also has a built in pillow case and straps to keep you attached to a sleeping pad. It is not very wide (made for backpacking) so if you are a large camper (north of 225 lbs) you will have to keep your arms outside to have enough room in the bag itself.
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    POWER without AC. This little device is handy. It's a USB Battery and Solar Charger. If you end up without AC at a campsite, this will power and charge all of your USB devices handily, even on cloudy days. It will also power a USB FAN. This can be invaluable on hot or humid days in your tent.
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Finally, a small packable tarp (classified as a Rain Fly) for hanging out in the shade or putting up over your tent for a large dry area may be to your liking. And it can provide much needed shade in the event you have no trees around your campsite. It also provides rain shelter for hanging around outside your tent in the rain. so you can sit outside but be dry. You can add tent poles (collapsable) but these add to the packing bulk significantly. This is a luxury. I've done without this tarp and done with it. It's fun to have it and very convenient. But you have to decide if packing space or comfort are your goals. You can do without the poles if you have some cord and two obliging trees that you can use to string the tarp up with. Again, your choice.
    Tarp LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    Poles LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (these do not pack small but are infinitely adjustable by using a simple hose clamp around the inserted pole)
    Poles LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Kelty-4198100...ble+tent+poles (These pack much smaller but have limited adjustment)

    For your bike, if you have ever parked on soft ground, you know you need a kickstand pad. I have tried many and even fabricated one out of aluminum. But this one for well under $10 at amazon is great. Very heavy duty plastic, light, yet rugged. You need this under your kickstand on soft ground.
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    One final note on a small packing yet warm sleeping bag, I have not tested this sleeping bag out yet, but plan to in the next few weeks. It packs very small in a stuff sack and is rated to 20 degrees F, 7 degrees C. My previous experience as I stated above with these small stuffsack sleeping bags is not good in cool weather, but this one may finally be the answer for small packing and warm nights.
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...A3TBSD6IMA8DZX

    That's it. 20 plus years of moto camping boiled down to some essentials. If you pack ultra-light, you have those choices, and for more heavier packing, there are nice essentials that you can add.

    Aloha!
    -3Sport
    Moto Tent Camping since 1995 via a 1995 Triumph Trophy 1200 and my 1982 Honda GL500 Interstate Silverwing

    "He Who Would Travel Happily Must Travel Light" - Antoine De St. Exupery

  2. #2
    American Gypsy privateer's Avatar
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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Great list!

    When I started camping in 1966, we didn't have good lists like this to learn from, so it was the school of hard knocks.

    Big fan of Amazon, they will ship to me any place that has an address (I always ask first, some places don't want to receive packages).

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    Gypsy JR
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  3. #3
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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Amazon has changed the landscape of shopping, and entertainment, that's for sure. Amazon Prime not only delivers many things to me in 2 days, but it's super easy to return product, and comes with a lot of entertainment like Amazon Prime Movies, Prime Fire TV, Prime Music, and more. I get most of my gear from Amazon these days, however, the tent is a Sears/K-Mart only tent. I've looked high and low and this is the best for under $200. And for around 25 bucks? It's a no-brainer. When I bought mine for $19.95 I expected it to last perhaps 1 season. Here it is going on the 9th season and the tent is STILL performing great. For 20 bucks? UNREAL!

    I just thought of a funny camping incident in Daytona Beach that some would find amusing. I was camping at the KOA in Daytona Beach many years ago in this 3 man tent. December. 70 degree days, but 40 degree nights, and damp. Chilly! I was the only tent camper there, and certainly the only Motorcycle camper. I had a small electric heater with me, and had AC at the site. The heater actually kept the tent at about 80 degrees at night even on low heat, so I had to turn the thermostat down to about 70, and even though it was raw outside, I slept on top of my bedroll in my skivvies. Comfy as if it were the middle of Summer.

    In the mornings, I'd go to the KampStore for coffee because it was inexpensive and good. The ladies working there would say, "Oh my, you are the poor motorcycle tent camper. You must be FREEZING you poor thing! Here, have a few cookies to give you some energy to warm up with this morning." They offered me home made cookies.

    I didn't have the heart to tell them I was sleeping in my tent with a heater and on top of my sleeping bag in my skivvies all night!

    Any of these kinds of heaters will work. I prefer the ones with TWO fan speeds (heat settings) and a thermostat included for auto on-off. Many of these have safety TIP-OFF settings in case they are tipped over, they shut off automatically. I put some aluminum foil under the heater on the tent floor or on the camp table surface in my tent just for added protection.
    LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Lasko-754200-...l+space+heater

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    American Gypsy privateer's Avatar
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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Its fun when they take pity on us, isn't it?

    As soon as RVers learn I'm an American Gypsy and live in my tent 365 days a year, I get invited to breakfast, coffee, tea, you name it.

    Little do they know!

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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Quote Originally Posted by privateer View Post
    Its fun when they take pity on us, isn't it?

    As soon as RVers learn I'm an American Gypsy and live in my tent 365 days a year, I get invited to breakfast, coffee, tea, you name it.

    Little do they know!
    That's priceless. And true! I have heard, "Oh, you are the poor motorcycle tent camper" many times in my travels. I never say anything other than, "Yep, that's me." You never know if you may just get invited to breakfast/lunch/dinner. The ladies at the KOA in Florda were the best, however. They would especially bring in home baked cookies for me because they felt sorry for my poor shivering bones in the rare 40 degree Florida nights. Best to say nothing but, "Why, thank so so kindly, ladies."

  6. #6

    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Great list. Also, get a small notebook and everything you reach for and don't have it, write it down in the notebook. When you get a chance, add it. Remember you don't have to wait till you get home to add it. You might get it in the next town.

    After a year or so if you didn't need something and haven't used it, discard it. Do that long enough and you whittle your stuff down to a very sleek manageable level.

  7. #7
    American Gypsy privateer's Avatar
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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Quote Originally Posted by sebjones906 View Post
    Great list. Also, get a small notebook and everything you reach for and don't have it, write it down in the notebook. When you get a chance, add it. Remember you don't have to wait till you get home to add it. You might get it in the next town.

    After a year or so if you didn't need something and haven't used it, discard it. Do that long enough and you whittle your stuff down to a very sleek manageable level.
    Exactly. I have a notebook, and it has a couple things to add. Having lived in my wagon for more than half a year, my kit is pared down and I also used the "never used" method, even though it was hard to remove a few things.

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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    I have to admit, when I first saw your post (I look at every post on this forum) I thought "Oh great, another 'this is what you need' camping list," but as I read it, I was very impressed. I'm no where nearly as experienced, but I'm at the point where I've got three "sets" - full blown trailer, for me and the wife, tent camping for me and the wife, and light camping just for me. If I had nothing at all, most of the things on your list would be added to all three sets. I've already bought different on some of them, but would say for anyone just starting out, you've put together something very useful. Even those more experienced wishing to update some some stuff, it's a great list.

    I already have a couple Sleep-Rite cots. About double the price of the one you showed (I got ours on sale), but I really like the ease of use and compact packing. I've been looking to replace my Pico chairs which just didn't hold up as well as I wanted, and I think the chairs you listed look like a good option. The USB charger is definitely going on my list. Last year we purchased a Kelty Trail Ridge 4 which is a great tent, but after looking at your recommendation (and showing it to my wife) we decided to buy a couple as gifts to grandkids, and one to put on my "me only" set for when I go camping. That looks to be a great little tent. The Kelty will still go when my wife and I camp together without the trailer.

    So, basically you just cost me $75

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  9. #9
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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    I have to admit, when I first saw your post (I look at every post on this forum) I thought "Oh great, another 'this is what you need' camping list," but as I read it, I was very impressed. I'm no where nearly as experienced, but I'm at the point where I've got three "sets" - full blown trailer, for me and the wife, tent camping for me and the wife, and light camping just for me. If I had nothing at all, most of the things on your list would be added to all three sets. I've already bought different on some of them, but would say for anyone just starting out, you've put together something very useful. Even those more experienced wishing to update some some stuff, it's a great list.

    I already have a couple Sleep-Rite cots. About double the price of the one you showed (I got ours on sale), but I really like the ease of use and compact packing. I've been looking to replace my Pico chairs which just didn't hold up as well as I wanted, and I think the chairs you listed look like a good option. The USB charger is definitely going on my list. Last year we purchased a Kelty Trail Ridge 4 which is a great tent, but after looking at your recommendation (and showing it to my wife) we decided to buy a couple as gifts to grandkids, and one to put on my "me only" set for when I go camping. That looks to be a great little tent. The Kelty will still go when my wife and I camp together without the trailer.

    So, basically you just cost me $75
    I understand. I hesitate to read "essentials" camping lists because I just know I'm going to see at least one thing that I must have. I'd say you got off easy at $75.

    There is a better charger (a tad more powerful) at Amazon, but it comes from China, and I had to wait over a month for mine to arrive. I had almost given up hope on ever getting it. The one that I posted is very decent and you'll get a lot of use out of it. The only thing is on the unit itself, it does not label the .5A side from the 2 amp size. But they are all the same (I have four different brands) The LEFT side is always low amps for a cell phone, and the right side is always 2 or 2.5 amps for a tablet. But you can certainly charge a cell on the 2.5 side. It just charges faster.

    I forgot to add in the post, ALL of these solar USB chargers have LED Lighting built in. They are BRIGHT. I prefer the little dome light I posted for general tent lighting, and the flashlight/lantern for spot lighting, but in a pinch, these solar charger/LED's can save the day.

    I hesitated to even post that list knowing that most here are seasoned pros, but I thought that some day, a newbie may read it and find one or two items that he or she has not thought of.

    I've got different camping "Sets" as well. One for the car, one for the Honda, one for the Triumph. Each one has slightly different items, but they really are all basically the same. Obviously, if I go car camping, to me, it's living very high on the hog. I have an 8 person 10 x 12 LL Bean Wall tent (canvas) that's like a small cabin to me. Huge cots, comfly air matresses, and the works. That's almost not camping. It's glamping.

    -3Sport

  10. #10
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    Re: 3Sport's Essential Moto-Camping Equipment List

    Great post.
    Thank you for the insight into chairs and stoves.
    I'm refining my kit and adding a few bits to replace older outdated gear.
    Cheers, David C
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    David C.
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