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Whistlin Dixie
07-24-2009, 05:11 PM
Pros and cons of the two types of stoves- we are getting ready to purchase a little two burner stove and was wondering which kind to get. any input would be appreciated.

bigTom
07-24-2009, 07:39 PM
I have both, the liquid gas model is broken, but I REALLY like the propane/butane model I got. Fast, hot and easy.

Trailace
07-24-2009, 07:50 PM
Pros and cons of the two types of stoves- we are getting ready to purchase a little two burner stove and was wondering which kind to get. any input would be appreciated.

I have both and use whichever one I think will be best for each ride. If I will be near towns or citys where fuel is available then I take gas but if I will be off the beaten path liquid. I also take the liquid stove if the temps will be cold because you can add more pis to the fuel tank by pumping it up. My liquid stove will also burn unleaded gas, diesel, white fuel and kerosene.

Not sure if anyone makes a dual fuel 2 burner stove.

motomac
07-24-2009, 09:01 PM
I have both and use whichever one I think will be best for each ride. If I will be near towns or citys where fuel is available then I take gas but if I will be off the beaten path liquid. I also take the liquid stove if the temps will be cold because you can add more pis to the fuel tank by pumping it up. My liquid stove will also burn unleaded gas, diesel, white fuel and kerosene.

Not sure if anyone makes a dual fuel 2 burner stove.

I'm with Rick on this one. I don't know of a two burner with dual fuel either. I do have a very old Coleman dual burner that takes only Coleman fuiel. Hasn't failed me in 40+ years. And goes on many trips yet. My sinlge burner dual fuel is great also, and the least used of all my stoves is my propane single burner. Too tall, too unstable, too bulky to pack. My neighbor gave it to me, so I own it. the gas dual burners are compact, lighter, and heat quickly. The bottles don't last long, so you have to use more, unless you adapt it to a big cannister via hose and regulator. Not really easy for motocamping.

G wizz
07-24-2009, 10:03 PM
We've been using propane for years on our camping trips.
We take a two burner stove, as the wife likes the convenience of being able to heat more than one thing at a time. It's a Sears suitcase style model, it's smaller and lighter than most two burner stoves, like the coleman, or Brinkman.
We like propane over liquid fuel (gas) - Easy lighting, no pumping - no smelly gas on your hands (and food) The 16 oz. propane tanks can be found most anywhere these days, and arn't all that expensive. - Ok sure, you have to carry an extra canister, but we feel the tradeoff is worth it, besides that, if your wife is doing the cooking, I'm sure she ain't gonna wanna mess with a stinky stove she has to screw around pouring gas into, and pump up. Trust me on that.

G wizz

Ironheadziggy76
07-24-2009, 11:34 PM
I used a propane/butane mix stove on my trip to AK and it did great. It's performance was slowed down in colder temps though. Here is a pic of my breakfast at 29 degrees F. on a frosty morning.

http://i179.photobucket.com/albums/w294/Ironheadziggy76/Alaska2009758.jpg

Liv2Ride
07-25-2009, 09:53 AM
As I have never used alcohol, multi-fuel or tea-light stoves I can only speak about the ISO butane/propane stoves. I have no complaints at all and because mine (Snow Peak) pack teeny tiny I carry two on most trips. I have a small grill/grate that folds flat with fold under legs that I bought from REI that sits above both burners and it too takes very little space. Everything is stable so I don't fully understand the unstable comment. Any stove is unstable if you place a pot or pan that is too big for the burner on top but with the grate sitting over the burners the size of the pan or pot is basically mute. I cook more than just water so flame control and no fuel smells on my hands or in my food is important. I agree with G Wizz with his insightful comments. Get the "cooks" input on exactly what will be cooked before buying something that basically works for heating water or prepackaged boil in water meals only. The canisters are so easy to come by. The average small can will burn for around an hour or so. That's continously and I can't think of one case when I needed to cook something on full blast for an hour. Again the most important advise is to ask the cook what the cook plans to cook and second how much space are you able to dedicate in your pack for your "kitchen".
Kat
:tent6:

Ripshod
07-25-2009, 11:06 AM
I also use butane/propane. I brew coffee every morning and about half of the nights I use it to cook a side dish. I pack three of the 8 oz. canisters and the stove in a small lunch box, one of those soft-sided deals and they fit perfectly. My problem has always been finding new canisters on the road. Three canisters will not last two weeks in the way I use them. I should also add that I use the same canisters for a single-mantel lantern. If not for the lantern three canisters would probably last for the whole two week trip.

The fuel canisters can be found on the road but they aren't as easy to find as the larger coleman-style propane tanks which can usually be found at any store (Target, WalMart, etc.) which carries even the bare minimum of camping supplies. On last year's trip we ran out of fuel with four days left on the trip. We grabbed a local phone book and found a Gander Mountain store so we diverted the route. In Canada, we found them in Canadian Tire. They're out there but you have to look.

This year I went out of my way to find the larger 16 oz. size canister (it was harder than I thought) so I'm packing two of those along with some extra 8 oz. canisters. I'm determined not to run out of fuel. The main reason I put myself through all this trouble is because of the lantern. I love the light that a mantle puts out. I've tried LED and fluorescent lanterns but I just don't like them. I almost made the switch to a dual fuel stove this year, probably to an Exponent. But as long as I insist on taking the lantern I'll always have to carry the butane/propane fuel anyway, and the stove packs really small as compared to the Exponent so for now I'll stick with it. Next year I'll probably figure out a way to make the switch.

Dixie, I'm not trying to hijack the thread - just rambling on. If you're trying to decide and you want a two-burner, I'd say that the propane canister fuel is probably the best way to go. The canisters last pretty long and if you get an adapter you can refill them from any propane tank, even if you have to wander the campground in search of a friendly RVer who'll let you refill off his tank for a few bucks. Dealing with gasoline refills is a pain and though you do supposedly have a constant supply right there in your bike, it's a bother to get at it, not to mention a tad bit dangerous.

Whistlin Dixie
07-25-2009, 03:42 PM
Thanks for all the good replies and info. This is a great site.

Trekker
07-25-2009, 07:28 PM
One other thing to consider regarding liquid fuel (like Coleman white gas)- storing extra in a Sigg or MSR bottle may leak just a little. The o-rings need to be in good shape to seal well. The odor that might escape could get into your other stuff it's packed with. Other's have not had this problem, so it may not be a major concern, just someting to think about.

Ironheadziggy76
07-27-2009, 07:18 AM
Ripshod, I noticed at the local Walmart they had the Coleman Peak1 butane stove on the shelf.

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=4722923

They also had the Coleman propane/butane mix canisters for less than $5.00.

bigTom
07-27-2009, 08:34 AM
Quote by Ironheadziggy76

Ripshod, I noticed at the local Walmart they had the Coleman Peak1 butane stove on the shelf.

That's the one I bought, when the Coleman dual fuel went TU. It has a valve in the canister, you can take it apart with out losing the fuel. The stove itself travels in a coffee cup, it's that compact. Not to mention fast. So far, I really like it...

Ripshod
07-27-2009, 10:19 AM
After typing that last post, actually while typing it, I convinced myself to update both the stove and the lantern and the whole reason is about the pack size. My old Century brand stove and lantern have performed well but as I pack for "the big one" coming up in less than two weeks, I kept thinking about the much smaller stuff that's out now. For instance, the Coleman Exponent F1 Lite Lantern (http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___85283). It has a wire mesh globe and it packs really, really small. The old one is the 10-year-old version of this but it uses P/B fuel and I had it packed in a foam-lined plastic can to protect the glass globe. It's almost as big as a large mayonnaise jar. Just that change alone is going to make a huge difference in my luggage space.

I almost matched it up with the Coleman Exponent F1 UltraLight Stove (http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___85280) but I decided to go with MSR's Pocket Rocket (http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___87758). It's even smaller and on sale too. The way I figure it, if the stove and lantern are so small I can justify taking along more fuel canisters. As if I really needed justification for getting more gear.

Placed the order with Campmor yesterday, awaiting notification of shipment. Whenever I order from there, I always browse the store for other things I need/want. Since they have their flat $7 shipping charge, it's a good idea to toss all the small cheap things in the box for the ride. I've been thinking about getting some Bungee Buddies (http://www.aerostich.com/catalog/US/Bungee-Loops-p-16206.html) but I really don't like the fact that they're so high-profile and, well, kind of ugly (not that I'm all that particular about appearances). Something simpler like this (http://www.aerostich.com/catalog/US/Luggage-Loops-p-16205.html) would be more my style but wow, they sure do think highly of those things charging $3.75 apiece for them. I thought I'd have to go to a marine store to find them but in Campmor's Canoeing and Kayaking department I found these deck loops (http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___70011) and I think they'll work just fine so I added a few to my order. I didn't order their nut/bolt combo because I think I can do better at the hardware store.

I also got a couple of pairs of polypropylene sock liners to go under the cotton socks I like. I've been lusting after those expensive little buggers for a while and they were on sale for $5 a pair. This is starting to sound like a Campmor advertisement but I love the place so I don't care.

Mr. Guy
07-27-2009, 11:17 AM
I just looked at Coleman's web site, they're the only ones I knew about that sell dual burner backpacking stoves. They have a dual-fuel liquid stove:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9780-B25C&categoryid=2005&brand=

And an iso-butane model, but it takes their "power max" cartridges, so may be hard to find fuel for that.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9730-725&categoryid=2005&brand=

I haven't tried either of these stoves, but I do have a F1 Ultralight stove I have been very happy with.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9741AA00C&categoryid=2005&brand=

Hope this helps, Guy

Trailace
07-27-2009, 06:12 PM
I just looked at Coleman's web site, they're the only ones I knew about that sell dual burner backpacking stoves. They have a dual-fuel liquid stove:

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9780-B25C&categoryid=2005&brand=

And an iso-butane model, but it takes their "power max" cartridges, so may be hard to find fuel for that.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9730-725&categoryid=2005&brand=

I haven't tried either of these stoves, but I do have a F1 Ultralight stove I have been very happy with.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9741AA00C&categoryid=2005&brand=

Hope this helps, Guy

Hey Guy hows it been going?

Ripshod
07-27-2009, 06:41 PM
And an iso-butane model, but it takes their "power max" cartridges, so may be hard to find fuel for that.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9730-725&categoryid=2005&brand=

That's a good-looking stove. I've seen them in stores and it's the smallest-packing two-burner stove I've seen. The fuel is a drawback but you can always get an adaptor (http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colemancom/detail.asp?product_id=9705-725&categoryid=2005) to use it with the more common canisters.

Mr. Guy
08-04-2009, 09:20 PM
Hey Guy hows it been going?



Hi Rick,

I've been kinda out of the loop for a while, other stuff keepin me busy.

I really thought hard about jumping in on the 50 passes, but other stuff prevailed, maybe next time.

Guy

Trailace
08-04-2009, 09:43 PM
Hi Rick,

I've been kinda out of the loop for a while, other stuff keepin me busy.

I really thought hard about jumping in on the 50 passes, but other stuff prevailed, maybe next time.

Guy

I had a lot of fun on the 50 passes ride and plan to do it again next year if Scott is up for it.